Innodis Ltd (HWF.mu) 2017 Abridged Report

first_imgInnodis Ltd (HWF.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2017 abridged results.For more information about Innodis Ltd (HWF.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Innodis Ltd (HWF.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Innodis Ltd (HWF.mu)  2017 abridged results.Company ProfileInnodis Limited is a Mauritian company that operates in the production and sale of various food and non-food items across the company’s segments which include Wholesale and Retail, Production and Distribution, amongst a few others. Within their production and distribution segment, the company engages in poultry farming, distribution of chicken, ice cream, yoghurt and other frozen food items, manufacturing, marketing and distribution of food and grocery products. Whilst in the ‘others’ segment they focus on manufacturing and distribution of animal feeds, as well as manufacturing, imports and distributive trading, retailing, franchising and consultancy. The Company, through its Poultry Division, produces chicken with an integrated operation of breeding farms, hatchery, broiler farms, quarantine farm and processing plants. It offers ice cream, and yoghurt and sterilized milk. Innodis Limited is headquartered in Port Louis, Mauritius. Innodis Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritiuslast_img read more

Fincorp Investment Ltd (FINC.mu) 2017 Abridged Report

first_imgFincorp Investment Ltd (FINC.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Investment sector has released it’s 2017 abridged results.For more information about Fincorp Investment Ltd (FINC.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Fincorp Investment Ltd (FINC.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Fincorp Investment Ltd (FINC.mu)  2017 abridged results.Company ProfileFincorp Investment Limited operates solely as an investment company that is fully owned by the Mauritius Commercial Bank. The company offers services in funds management, property investment, and specialised services in mortgaging, property investment products and property development. Fincorp Investment Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

Veritas Kapital Assurance Plc (VERITA.ng) Q32017 Interim Report

first_imgVeritas Kapital Assurance Plc (VERITA.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2017 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Veritas Kapital Assurance Plc (VERITA.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Veritas Kapital Assurance Plc (VERITA.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Veritas Kapital Assurance Plc (VERITA.ng)  2017 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileVeritas Kapital Assurance Plc is a leading insurance company in Nigeria licensed to cover all classes of non-life insurance products and services. The company was formerly known as Unity Kapital Assurance Plc and incorporated in 1973 as a private liability company under the name Kano State Insurance Company. Non-life insurance products and services offered by Veritas Kapital Assurance Limited includes auto insurance which covers motor third party, fire and theft; home insurance which covers risk of fire, flooding and burglary; aviation insurance which covers hull losses as well as liability for passenger injuries, death, environmental and third-party damage caused by aircraft accidents; marine insurance which covers hull and cargo damage; engineering insurance which covers problems related to production capacity and financial losses; oil and gas insurance which covers all issues related to employees, physical assets, balance sheets and long-term viability; and bond insurance which is a financial guarantee taken out by contractors to indemnify them against any defaults. Veritas Kapital Assurance Plc offers medical insurance and pension fund administration services through its subsidiaries; Health Care Security Limited and FUG Pensions Limited. The company’s head office is in Abuja, Nigeria. Veritas Kapital Assurance Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Rugby Rant: European rugby letting down minnows

first_imgThe chances of outsiders rising to be contenders just receded further. Without games, how are they meant to step up? The first-ever European game involved a Romanian team but now, instead of opening up, the door’s pretty much been shut to them, and definitely to others like the Portuguese.With the top competition final being taken from Italy’s San Siro to Twickenham too, the pattern could not be clearer.Worse, established sides in Tier One nations are making it even less likely for lower-level clubs to step up. Brive, Saracens and Clermont have set up links in the Pacific Islands to feed into their academies. Cutting the European third tier harms the minnows, argues barrister Tim O’Connor Rare chance: Bucharest Wolves are one of the lucky few minnows to play European rugby LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Last year, one team in eight in Europe was from outside the three professional leagues. This year, it’ll be one in 20. At the most.Another day, another disappointment, as European Professional Club Rugby’s (EPCR) proposed third-tier event was quietly postponed until next year.The reserve price on French TV rights, ERC being asked back to run this year’s competitions, still waiting for fixtures for later rounds – missed targets are nothing new in EPCR’s brief history. This is particularly bad, though, because it hits the weakest hardest.Last season we heard a lot in the interminable fight over European club rugby – that the game had to be widened, new teams brought into the fold. The new regime promised a third tier to do just that. With the recent announcement – notably absent from EPCR’s site – that there will be no competition, we’ve seen that far from things getting better, they have got worse for those on the outside.We were told in March that Portugal, Russia, Spain and Belgium would all be joining the party. Instead, European rugby just became even more of a closed shop. Does anyone doubt Sarries’ signing up of teams in Romania and Georgia as feeders is any different, that the aim is to source players from Tier Two countries to feed their own needs?How Tier One unions and clubs treat their Tier Two counterparts is like a feudal relationship. Send men; know your place; be grateful for it. They are vassals, and are likely to remain so.last_img read more

‘Forgiveness biggest challenge for Zimbabwe Anglicans,’ says bishop

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. February 8, 2013 at 12:58 pm I hope the youth will continue to believe the Church is composed of the Body of Christ, with Christ as the Head. The buildings serve a purpose, but they are not the Church. If you believe that you have been forgiven first, and that Christ gives you the grace to forgive, it becomes more reasonable and possible to forgive. The Our Father seems to put the emphasis on our forgiving BEFORE we are forgiven, but I think that it is the other way around. Since we have been forgiven by God (Christ died on the cross to take away sin) we are now able to forgive others with his grace…not through our own power, but his. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Africa, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Bellah ZuluPosted Feb 7, 2013 Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Joyce Ann Edmondson says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Comments (1) ‘Forgiveness biggest challenge for Zimbabwe Anglicans,’ says bishop Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglican Bishop of Harare Chad Gandiya has said that forgiveness still remains the biggest challenge for Christians in his diocese after years of “living in exile.”“People are very happy to have returned to their churches but they are still hurting. The church needs to find new ways of teaching on healing and forgiveness,” he said.The bishop was referring to the pain suffered after breakaway bishop Nolbert Kunonga and his supporters grabbed church properties, schools and orphanages, leaving loyal Anglicans without any place to worship.“All our properties are now back in our hands,” the bishop said. “We know that Dr. Kunonga tried to go back to court but I don’t think it will go anywhere.”Gandiya is grateful to God for having delivered the properties back to the diocese. He said, “God is faithful and this is something we have experienced during the different moments in our diocese. We can testify to his goodness and faithfulness.”The bishop said that the time spent “in exile” made it difficult for the church to pursue many church programs because they had to use rented properties. “Now we can pursue other aspects of ministry with a lot of joy and appreciation,” he said.Anglicans in Zimbabwe still have the challenge of rebuilding and renovating the various properties that had been through many years of neglect.Gandiya said, “We are commissioning a forensic audit to ascertain and establish the extent of damage and misuse. One parish has already spent over US$30,000 for renovation works and they are not yet done.”Despite the joy at having returned to the buildings, an Anglican youth leader from the Diocese of Harare, Tafadzwa Chimbete, feels it is taking too long for people to adapt to the new reality. He believes there are still many more “pressing issues” that the church needs to deal with.“We need to find a way of getting the youths excited about the Church of God,” he said. “With the negative influences coming in from the Internet and the media, young people need to access their spiritual standing. We need to continue fighting because the (warfare) does not end here.”[Watch December’s news report of Zimbabwe Anglican’s return to the Cathedral at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G2Ubqw6Xyk] Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

José A. McLoughlin becomes Western North Carolina’s seventh bishop

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 House of Bishops Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Rt. Rev. José A. McLoughlin addresses the congregation during his ordination and consecration as bishop of the Diocese of Western North Carolina. Photo: Chris Goldman, Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina[Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina] The Rt. Rev. José Antonio McLoughlin was ordained and consecrated Oct. 1 as the seventh bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina.McLoughlin was elected as bishop on June 25 at Trinity Episcopal Church in Asheville after serving as canon to the ordinary in the Diocese of Oklahoma since 2008.More than 1,000 people attended the service at Kimmel Arena on the University of North Carolina-Asheville campus. As the diocese welcomed McLoughlin and his family, it also said farewell to the Rt. Rev. G. Porter Taylor, who had served as bishop of Western North Carolina since 2004.Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry was the chief consecrator. The Rev. Canon Michael Barlowe, executive officer of the General Convention, and the Rev. Canon Michael Buerkel Hunn, canon to the presiding bishop.Bishops in attendance were Peter Eaton (Southeast Florida), Matthew Alan Gunter (Fond du Lac), Dena A. Harrison (Texas), Anne E. Hodges-Copple (North Carolina), Robert H. Johnson (Western North Carolina), Don E. Johnson (West Tennessee), Peter Lee (North Carolina), James Magness (Armed Services and Federal Ministries), Brian R. Seage (Mississippi), Robert S. Skirving (East Carolina), Dabney Tyler Smith (Southwest Florida), Morris King Thompson, Jr. (Louisiana), W. Andrew Waldo (Upper South Carolina), Terry Allen White (Kentucky), D. Wayne Burkette (Moravian Church in North America) and Tim Smith (North Carolina Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America).The Rev. John Ohmer, rector of Falls Church Episcopal in Falls Church, Virginia, preached and spoke passionately about his long friendship with McLoughlin, praising both his practical outlook and passionate faith. “José has been for me a sounding board and a source of wisdom and encouragement,” he said.McLoughlin told the congregation that the diocese “has at its core, in its DNA, a love in the service of Jesus, a history of loving and serving neighbors, and I’m excited to join you — that’s what drew me here.”Ordained in 2005, McLoughlin earned his Masters in Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary and Bachelor of Arts from the University of Central Florida. Prior to his call to the priesthood, McLoughlin worked in the criminal justice field serving in the State of Florida as a police officer and in the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. in various capacities, most recently as the special assistant/senior advisor to the assistant attorney general.McLoughlin and his wife Laurel have been married for 23 years, and together have two children, Alexander, 17, and Alyson, 14. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, McLoughlin is bilingual, enjoys music, playing the drums, and studying 18th century American history.The diocese has 15,000 members in 63 year-round congregations, six summer chapels and two conference centers.Editor’s note: A previous version of this story said Bishop G. Porter Taylor began his service to the diocese in 2008. His term began in 2004. Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Posted Oct 4, 2016 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC José A. McLoughlin becomes Western North Carolina’s seventh bishopcenter_img Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Elections, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Beach Walk House / SPG Architects

first_img Projects ArchDaily United States CopyHouses•Patchogue, United States CopyAbout this officeSPG ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodGlass#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodHousesPatchogueUnited StatesPublished on September 07, 2012Cite: “Beach Walk House / SPG Architects” 07 Sep 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Metropol ClassicVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish- DI-NOC™ Glass FinishPartitionsSkyfoldWhere to Increase Flexibility in SchoolsMetal PanelsDri-DesignMetal Panels – Painted AluminumStonesCosentinoDekton® Surfaces – Chicago 444Exterior DeckingLunawoodThermowood DeckingWoodBruagAcoustic Panels with LEDWindowsOTTOSTUMM | MOGSWindow Systems – CPXPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsHexapent Facade PanelDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Folding Door System – Rabel 3710 Super ThermalWall / Ceiling LightsLuminisCeiling Surface Lights – HollowcoreBenches / TablesUrbaStyleConcrete Bench – BoomerangMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Beach Walk House / SPG ArchitectsSave this projectSaveBeach Walk House / SPG Architects Photographs:  Jimi Billingsley & Daniel LevinText description provided by the architects. This Fire Island house is located directly behind beach-front dunes. The strict requirements of both FEMA and local codes regarding height, lot line, setbacks, and site coverage; the proximity of neighbors; and very specific view corridors all presented a host of challenges.Save this picture!© Jimi Billingsley & Daniel LevinOur response was to create a dynamic composition of three intersecting rectilinear forms, which is rotated on the site off the prevailing grid. This decision maximized both views and privacy. The volume at grade is delineated by dark, vertically slatted, wood breakaway walls, which obscure the support pilings and provide storage for water sports equipment.Save this picture!© Jimi Billingsley & Daniel LevinThe center volume, clad in horizontal wood siding, houses bedrooms & baths and provides roof decks for the living level. The metallic clad upper volume contains a large, open-plan living space with spectacular water views.Save this picture!© Jimi Billingsley & Daniel LevinThe upper two living volumes reverse the typical public/private relationship of rooms so that the primary living spaces can fully enjoy the extended views of the island and the ocean. The middle volume contains the five bedrooms – the four guest rooms for the adult children of the family all laid out exactly the same, with a more commodious master bedroom suite.Save this picture!© Jimi Billingsley & Daniel LevinThe soft neutral colors and natural wood tones used in the architecture are enlivened by the bold use of color used throughout the house in furnishings, textiles and art prints. Indoor-outdoor furniture is used throughout the interiors and the exterior decks, unifying this vacation home’s living spaces with a bright and vibrant palette.Save this picture!Floors PlansProject gallerySee allShow less’Harry Seidler: Architecture, Art and Collaborative Design’ ExhibitionArticlesAxiom Town Headquarter Complex / MBAD Arquitectos + X ArchitectsArticles Share Houses Photographs Year:  Save this picture!© Jimi Billingsley & Daniel Levin+ 21 Share “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/268683/beach-walk-house-spg-architects Clipboard Beach Walk House / SPG Architects Area:  4637 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Architects: SPG Architects Area Area of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/268683/beach-walk-house-spg-architects Clipboard “COPY” 2011last_img read more

Charity Bank issues a guide for charities on borrowing money

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Finance Law / policy About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Charity Bank issues a guide for charities on borrowing money Howard Lake | 7 November 2013 | News When is a loan a good choice for a charity or social enterprise? While fear of debt, especially in the current financial climate, is sensible, the right kind of loan can help organisations thrive.Charity Bank has issued a Guide to Borrowing for Charity Trustees to help them decide if a loan could be right for their charity or one of its projects. It has been published in blog format by Charity Bank’s Head of Banking, Carolyn Sims. It appears on the National Council for Voluntary Organisations’ (NCVO) website and also on Charity Bank’s own site.Sims said: “Loans can help organisations become more sustainable – for example, by enabling them to acquire a property rather than paying rent. But charity loans are not right for all projects or all organisations, so trustees need to understand what loan finance can offer to determine if it is a suitable option for their charity.”The guide describes five main benefits of loans over grants:1. Fewer restrictions2. Non-competitive3. Money when you need it4. A relationship with financial experts5. Cash flowThe guide then describes what lenders look for in potential borrowers.As well as ensuring that an organisation can pay the loan back, Sims explains that lenders will look at the charity’s governance, including whether its trustees and staff have a suitable skill set that includes the key business areas of finance and law.She added: “Where social lenders, like Charity Bank, differ from commercial banks is the attention paid to social impact. If you can illustrate and provide tangible examples that your organisation is delivering social good, they will be much more willing to provide you with a loan”.Photo: IOU in a piggy bank by Brian A Jackson on Shutterstock.com  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Focus on Tough Issues Begins Commodity Classic

first_imgA lot of time was devoted to technology, both technology that is being used today as well as technology that will be developed over the next 20 years. Not only is this technology being used for production but increasingly in food marketing. Barcodes on food products in retail stores are not only providing price and inventory, but also product traceability. Jim Blome, President and CEO of Bayer Crop Science, stressed how vital continued investment in innovation is for the kind of increased food production that will be needed in the future. He said the industry needs to make consumers more comfortable with the innovations that are coming, “The products that farmers use undergo a decade of testing and research before they come to the market.  Products are not approved by likes on facebook.”  But consumers are exerting increased pressure on firms like Bayer, and the forum spent a good deal of time discussing how agriculture can respond. Facebook Twitter Danielle NierenberThe forum did not conclude with specific recommendations except that the future will be much different for agriculture and food production and that farmers and consumers will have to make changes to adapt.  Danielle Nierenberg, president of Food Tank, stressed that more dialogue is needed between all participants in the food system. Facebook Twitter Focus on Tough Issues Begins Commodity Classic Jim BlomeAs the nation’s top grain and soybean farmers gather in Phoenix, AZ for Commodity Classic 2015, some of the toughest issues facing agriculture are being discussed and debated. The Ag Issues Forum, sponsored by Bayer Crop Science, brings together farmers, ag media, industry leaders, and critics of agriculture to focus on issues like innovation, food production, GMOs, animal care, sustainability, traceability,  regulations, climate change, and more.  Unlike many farm gatherings, the forum provides an exploration of points of view both from within and outside of agriculture. Home Indiana Agriculture News Focus on Tough Issues Begins Commodity Classic Dr. Mae JamisonThe understanding and acceptance of science was addressed by Dr. Mae Jamison, former NASA astronaut and a member of the Science Makes Sense program.  She stressed the importance of STEM education and why science literacy is important for all consumers to make informed choices about food and other everyday choices. By Gary Truitt – Feb 25, 2015 Consumer calls for sustainability and traceability was discussed by a panel representing traditional agricultural and niche producers.  Food fads, misinformation about food and farming, and changing consumer priorities are all producing  challenges for agriculture. Government regulations that once were a trusted standard for consumers are no long enough. Previous articleHoosier Farmer Honored with National Sustainable AwardNext articleIndiana Weather Forecast 2/26/2015 Gary Truitt SHARE SHARE A panel of millennialsA panel of millennials also discussed how the perceptions of food and farming are different for this upcoming generation. “Our generation thinks they know a lot about food and agriculture, but we really don’t,” said panelist Emily Best.last_img read more

Justice D. M. Chandrashekhar-A Centenary Tribute (26.9.1920 – 3.10.2003)

first_imgColumnsJustice D. M. Chandrashekhar-A Centenary Tribute (26.9.1920 – 3.10.2003) V.Sudhish Pai26 Sep 2020 12:09 AMShare This – xThe very name Deshamudre Mallappa Chandrashekhar evokes feelings of reverence and brings to mind a gentle stalwart in every sense. He was indeed a colossus on whom everything sat lightly. He was a great judge and a great man, but he was more, almost approximating to an ideal. It is in the fitness of things that we remember and pay tribute to him on his birth centenary and record…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe very name Deshamudre Mallappa Chandrashekhar evokes feelings of reverence and brings to mind a gentle stalwart in every sense. He was indeed a colossus on whom everything sat lightly. He was a great judge and a great man, but he was more, almost approximating to an ideal. It is in the fitness of things that we remember and pay tribute to him on his birth centenary and record our gratitude for such a noble and exemplary life. He was the ultimate in being a gentleman. He did not wear his learning or great qualities on his sleeve. He had humility which Emerson said raises one to the highest point of sublimity and that wonderful quality of simplicity of nature which Tennyson spoke of the Iron Duke: And, as the greatest only are, In his simplicity sublime. This is an occasion for remembering, rejoicing and introspecting. Tradition, said Carlyle, is an enormous magnifier. But traditions are not like instant coffee. Each generation would have to imbibe and cherish them. Prof. Upendra Baxi aptly observed that we live in an era of massacre of ancestors which is now considered a public virtue and a sign of worldly progress. But collective amnesia of what happened in the past is not an estimable value. Without living in the past, its recall is important, for it necessarily presages a future. We cannot forget the enduring relevance of the past and its torch bearers. Justice Chandrashekhar was born on September 26, 1920 at Tiptur. His father Shri D.S. Mallappa was active in public life and was a member of the erstwhile Mysore Legislative Council. He was one amongst the earliest to stage a walk out of the House which earned him the sobriquet of Walkout Mallappa. His mother was Smt.Gangamma. Among their eight sons and two daughters, Chandrashekhar was the second child and son. He did his schooling at Tiptur and collegiate studies at Intermediate College and Central College, Bangalore from where he graduated in 1940 with a degree in Economics. He studied law at Government Law College, Bombay and secured his law degree in 1942. 1942 was the age of national fervour and the peak of the freedom struggle with the Mahatma’s clarion call to the British in August 1942 to quit India. Young Chandrashekhar participated in the Quit India Movement and was in jail for sometime. He then proceeded to do his Masters in Economics from Central Hindu College, Benaras Hindu University, Varanasi where the venerable Dr. Radhakrishnan was the then Vice Chancellor. He obtained the MA degree in 1944 securing the first rank and winning the gold medal. He then joined Government service but resigned sometime later. On May 23, 1945 Chandrashekhar married Smt. Umadevi who is now only 5 years short of a century and is happily with us. They have two sons- Amarnath who is an engineer and settled in the US and Shivdev who is into the advertising industry and is in Bangalore. Chandrashekhar was enrolled as an Advocate on January 24, 1946 and started his career in law which was to be his lifelong profession. For a long time he was a junior of Shri Ethirajulu Naidu, a doyen of the Bar and the State’s Advocate General for several years as also the Standing Counsel for Income Tax Department. All this gave Chandrashekhar a great exposure to a variety of cases and a large canvas of practice and a firm grounding in various branches of law. The senior reposed immense confidence in him and the junior fully justified it and lived up to the senior’s expectations. His practice was generally in the High Court and included civil, criminal, constitutional and tax cases. He tried to enter public life like his father and unsuccessfully contested as a candidate for the State Assembly from Tiptur constituency in the first general election in 1952. That was his only short brush with politics. He then concentrated on law alone and made it really good. Chandrashekhar was Government Pleader in the High Court from November 1957 to March 1963 and he handled the bulk of the State’s litigation. Between March 1963 and September 1963 he was Assistant Advocate General. Whether as counsel for a private litigant or for the State and its authorities, his preparation for a case was always thorough and his arguments were succinct and objective. A fair opponent, he graciously conceded untenable positions. He was held in high esteem by the judges and the advocates and commanded respect and admiration. Chandrashekhar was appointed Additional Judge of the then Mysore High Court on September 20, 1963 and then began a glorious judicial career. He became a permanent judge on March 15, 1965. In July 1976, at the height of the spurious Emergency he was transferred to the Allahabad High Court. This was considered a case of victimization for his bold and ringing judgment in the Habeas Corpus case of the Opposition leaders. On May 9, 1977 he was appointed Chief Justice of Allahabad High Court. He declined judgeship of the Supreme Court. It is interesting that in his letter to the Chief Justice of India on October 3, 1977, Justice Chandrashekhar requested the CJI to withdraw his name from the CJI’s recommendation for the judgeship of the Supreme Court. He was transferred back to the Karnataka High Court as Chief Justice on March 22, 1978 and retired as such on September 25, 1982. These are the bare details, but they hardly reveal his qualities as a judge and a man. His judicial tenure was marked by a sound knowledge of law, a true sense of justice tempered with mercy, sturdy uprightness, staunch independence, sterling integrity. He discharged the duties of his office and dispensed justice absolutely in consonance with his judicial oath. No considerations except the merits of the case ever mattered to him. It might be said of him as was said of Sir Asutosh Mookerjee, that no junior felt embarrassed in his court where good law was well administered and he ever walked with a firm step holding aloft the torch of justice. His one burning desire was to do real justice. He was patience personified. He did not lose his temper or indulge in cheap jokes. He treated everyone with unfailing courtesy and unfeigned humility. All who knew him or came in contact with him will recollect with nostalgic pleasure his innate graciousness. He never dismissed any case for default. Indeed, no judge worth his salt is expected to do that. That is not dispensing justice, but dispensing with justice and adding to the statistics; that is not what judges are there for. If lawyers were not present, he would send for them and hear them at their convenience. A court room is to reflect an atmosphere of freedom and fairness. As Justice Chagla said, discourtesy to the Bar is essentially evidence of weakness in the judge and while dispatch is important, dispatch at the cost of justice is a complete perversion of the judicial process. In Justice Chandrashekhar’s court none felt ill at ease and all were sure that every effort was made to see that right was not worsted and that wrong did not triumph. His 19 years long tenure as judge and chief justice of two premier High Courts is reflected in the law reports and his judgments cover a wide spectrum of the law. He was particular that a judge had to give his best to every judgment or order that he wrote and therefore he should bestow his full attention and, if necessary, revise and re -revise whatever is written. Justice Chandrashekhar was soft as a flower and hard as a diamond. While he was always gentle, kind and soft spoken, he could be quite stern and unwavering in upholding the rights of the people and the independence and dignity of the judiciary. As the senior most puisne judge of the Karnataka High Court he had told the then Chief Justice of India, Shri A.N.Ray who wanted to sit in the court on the dais with the High Court judges so as to help him make appointments to the Supreme Court, that the High Court judges were not inviting him (CJI) or permitting him to sit with them. He said that under the Constitution the High Court was not administratively subordinate to the Supreme Court and the CJI sitting on the dais to watch the proceedings would give an impression that he was inspecting the High Court which he was not entitled to. To the CJI’s remark that he would be justified in sitting on the dais because he had a constitutional responsibility of recommending suitable judges of the High Court for appointment to the Supreme Court, Justice Chandrashekhar typically replied that in that event the High Court judges were not interested in becoming judges of the Supreme Court. What a stellar example of independence and integrity! During the Emergency, he presided over the Bench dealing with preventive detention cases and habeas corpus petitions. He would direct that detenus be brought to the court when their cases were being heard. This was to enable them to watch the arguments in their cases and even more to help them come outside the jail, breathe some fresh air and see their relatives, friends and lawyers. So great was his solicitude for liberty and the sentiments of the citizens. In the habeas corpus petition of Shri Atal Behari Vajpayee, Justice Chandrshekhar (in tune with many other High Courts) held that while the proclamation of emergency or its continuance was not justiciable, in spite of the Presidential Order suspending enforcement of the fundamental rights under Arts 21 and 22, the court could examine whether the order of detention was in accordance with law and satisfied the conditions precedent for the exercise of the power, whether it was malafide and whether it was based on relevant material, and pass appropriate orders accordingly. This view of nine High Courts was overturned by the Supreme Court in ADM, Jabalpur. The law declared therein was nullified by the Constitution 44th Amendment Act in 1979; while the obsequies were performed in the Privacy judgment in 2017. His judgment in favour of the citizens, upholding the right to personal liberty resulted in his transfer to Allahabad in July, 1976. But it earned him the admiration and esteem of all lovers of liberty. He had adhered to his conscience and the judicial oath and a true interpretation of the Constitution. Post retirement, Justice Chandrashekhar deeply involved himself in social service and devoted his time and energy to many a noble cause. His life and work exemplified simple living and high thinking. He knew with Disraeli that money is not the measure of a man, but it is often the means of finding out how small he is. We recall Justice Brandeis’ telling remark that independence comes not from the amount one earns, but from how one spends whatever one earns, that is, from the kind of life one leads. The purpose of arbitration is to achieve simplicity, expedition and economy. Justice Chandrashekhar would hold most of his arbitration sittings in Gandhi Bhavan. That ensured minimum expense for the parties and also meant some contribution to a noble cause. There is the instance of the party proposing that the arbitration be held at Hotel West End, Bangalore and Justice Chandrashekhar suggesting and having it fixed up at Gandhi Bhavan. The fee that he charged as arbitrator was meagre, particularly compared to the present day mercenary tendencies. Once he was an arbitrator in a case where one of the parties was a British company. Some sittings were in London. The sittings extended over the weekend. He was put up in Hotel Savoy in London. He considered such luxurious accommodation a criminal waste of money and shifted to Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan for his stay. Such was his sense of austerity. In another arbitration between NGEF and a German company- AEG, he found, on making a study, that NGEF had a weak case and continuing with the arbitration was unnecessary, avoidable expenditure and an award going against NGEF would be a drain on the tax payer’s money. He accordingly advised a settlement which was entered into between the parties thus saving public money. This was the man. His sense of austerity and lack of ostentation are also borne out by the fact that when people from his home town Tiptur wanted to felicitate him on his becoming the Chief Justice, he quietly turned down the offer and asked them instead to spend the money they had earmarked for the felicitation for improving civic amenities in their place. Justice Chandrashekhar was equally simple and unostentatious in his personal life. He was a true Gandhian. He was frugal in his habits. He preferred to walk rather than go by car whenever the distance to be covered was walkable. He was generous to a fault, spending so little on himself. He was blessed with a life partner who shared his ideas and ideals. Smt. Umadevi denied herself many worldly pleasures and comforts to keep pace with her sage-like husband and rendered it easy for him to live his life in the manner he wished and donate his time, attention and money for worthy causes. Even in his death he was the same. He passed away quietly and unobtrusively as to the manner born on October 3, 2003 aged 83. In accordance with his Will his eyes were donated to an eye bank and his body handed over to the Anatomy Department of M. S. Ramaiah Medical College for medical research. As directed, the liquid assets out of the savings of his individual income were donated to charity. “…If human life is not to suffer from incompleteness and imperfections, it has to seek satisfaction from those inner yearnings, deep and dormant, which manifest themselves in emotions and feelings, the craving in the human heart for things of beauty, of art, things which put us in tune with the still sad music of humanity and the melody born out of the pain and joy of life.” Justice Chandrashekhar was fully aware of this verity and for him all power and authority were only mere wayside stops in an exciting journey of exploration of the moral and spiritual dimensions of one’s personality. It may be said of him that he prized most of all an untarnished soul, striving to set his own standards and values and live in the world without seeking its approval or flinching at its detraction. He was aware that the only footprints that remain on the sands of time and are indeed worth leaving, are the footprints that are formed and grow out of a man’s competence and character. All outward embellishments, all that one normally considers very valuable, the trappings of office, the paraphernalia that surrounds it, the pomp and show that become an accompaniment of status, are rooted in the weakness of human nature. No man of vision or substance attaches importance to them. Justice Chandrashekhar never did. He endeavoured to so live as to fulfill Rudyard Kipling’s prayer: Grant us the strength that cannot seek/In thought or word to harm the weak/ That under thee we may possess/ Man’s strength to comfort man’s distress. It is a sad reflection on the spirit of our times that half- baked ideas reared by chance have sway and what is expedient passes for the ethical. The engulfing tides of the general decline in values and ideals in society as a whole have not turned their course and passed by any individual or institution. The crucial issue is to restore the ethical and moral dimension to our individual and public life. Sure footed time will tread out lesser figures. Justice Chandrashekhar will continue to live in our minds and hearts. As Thomas Campbell said he is not dead ‘whose glorious mind lifts thine on high, to live in hearts we leave behind is not to die.’ If our heritage is not to perish and our society is to endure, we need to remember and honour such men. In an atmosphere where pursuit of the higher and nobler ideals is becoming increasingly rare, it is well for us to pause and take count of our coarser selves. It will be fruitful to recall and take inspiration from men like him. He has a lesson to teach us, if we care to stop and learn; a lesson quite at variance with most that we practise and much that we profess. The greatest tribute one can pay a man is to emulate him and carry forward his legacy. That is what we owe to ourselves. These beautiful words from Milton’s Paradise Lost aptly describe Justice Chandrashekhar: …….. unmoved,/Unshaken, unseduced, unterrified,/ His loyalty he kept, his love, his zeal,/ Nor number, nor example, with him wrought / To swerve from truth or change his constant mind.Views are personal only.Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more