Students prepare for the MCAT

first_imgNotre Dame pre-med students face a notoriously difficult schedule with academic and extracurricular activities, a stressful balancing act which reaches new heights when it comes time to take the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT).  Junior biology and theology major Antoinette Pusateri said she will be one of the pre-med students taking the test this upcoming Saturday. Although she has faced a busy schedule because of the additional task of studying for the MCAT this semester, Pusateri said there are some positive results stemming from the experience of studying for the MCAT. “If anything, what I would take away from the whole pre-med, studying-for-the-MCAT experience would be the art of prioritizing, of time management,” Pusateri said. “It’s definitely been a learning curve, but that’s kind of the college experience for everybody.” Pusateri said she set up a study schedule specifically for the MCAT, and made sure she stuck to it. “I really started hardcore studying after finals fall semester and then really every day since then, with a few days off,” Pusateri said. “[I’ve been studying] at least a couple hours a day,” Pusateri said.  Despite stress associated with studying for the MCAT, Pusateri said she feels prepared for the exam on Saturday.  “First and foremost, I don’t think anywhere else prepares us better than Notre Dame,” Pusateri said. “I went through the notecards and notes that our professor had us make for organic chemistry and basically, out of all the cards and notes I had, I only needed a fourth of that for studying.” Junior biology and peace studies major Gwyneth Sullivan is electing to take the MCAT in late May, outside of the confines of the semester, but within the upcoming admissions cycle. Though her test date is further away, she said she still has tried to continue her preparation, which started is January. “Ideally, I’m doing two hours of study a night, but realistically if I have a huge exam, like my physics test this week, I’ll push it off a little bit” Sullivan said. “It’s a lot of time management.” A prominent factor in her decision to take the MCAT in May rather than this Saturday is the annual benefit her family hosts in Chicago in remembrance of her brother, Declan Sullivan, she said. “The benefit is actually this weekend so there’s no way I could have physically taken the MCAT,” Sullivan said. “Especially in the last three weeks, I’ve been doing so much logistical work for it that it’s been hard to study.” Other pre-med students have decided to forego sitting the MCAT during the school year in favor of taking it during the summer. Chantal Berry, a junior anthropology and preprofessional major, is one student who chose this less traditional path, instead opting to take the MCAT in August. “What I found with my friends that were either taking the MCAT this weekend or in May was that it’s been a very stressful semester,” Berry said. “I didn’t really want to have that stress, I wanted to get the most out of my college experience in terms of the academics and I wanted the sole focus to be the academics.” Taking the test later means Berry will not receive her scores in time for the upcoming admissions cycle, but she said she already decided on taking a gap year after finishing her studies at Notre Dame. “I think the decision to take a gap year was partially the MCAT reason but also just because I wanted that time off before once again getting right back into academics and medical school,” Berry said. Contact Henry Gens at [email protected]last_img read more

Summer Vacation

first_imgToday it is your kids who determine when your summer vacation will occur.  It used to be that the head of the family or his/her job determined when you got off.  Now you have to check your child or children’s summer camp schedule to see when you get to go on vacation.In a state like Indiana, you only have 2 months off from school.  The month of June is normally heavily scheduled with athletic contests.  That means you have as few as 4 weeks in July to go on a trip.  Is this really summer vacation?last_img

Adjustment dials must be disabled, sealed on Crane ignition boxes in 2017

first_imgVINTON, Iowa – IMCA will require four ignition boxes available from Crane Ignition to have adjustment dials disabled and permanently sealed when used in sanctioned Modified, Late Model or Stock Car competition in 2017.Those ignition boxes are:Crane HI-6RC ignition part number 6000-6700;Crane HI-6N Oval track ignition part number 6000-6410 (Weatherpak Plug);Crane HI-6N Oval track ignition, part number 6000-6412 (Deutsch Plug);and Crane HI-6RN oval track ignition, part number 6000-6750 (Digital).“These ignition boxes all have adjustable RPM limits and, as a result, an issue that allows them to operate at a different RPM limit than what the box is physically set with the adjustment dials,” explained Dave Brenn, IMCA’s executive director of competition. “For 2017, these existing Crane ignition boxes will still be allowed but must have the adjustment dials disabled and permanently sealed, effectively making the box operate as a preset RPM limited box.”“After choosing the desired RPM limit, the box must have a cover plate permanently sealed with an epoxy-type adhesive over the dials,” he continued. “Silicone or other non-permanent adhesives will not be allowed.  Failure to seal these ignition boxes will result in an immediate disqualification when used in any IMCA event.”On Dec 31, 2017, all four products will be removed from IMCA’s approved ignition list.last_img read more

New documentary ‘A Stranded Nation’ to have double screening this Thursday at The Lido Theatre

first_imgThe two special screenings of ‘A Stranded Nation’ is taking place June 27 at The Lido Theatre, with a screening at 11:30 a.m. and the next at 6:00 p.m.Tickets for each screening is $25.00 per person.For tickets and information, you can call The Lido at 250-785-3011. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – This Thursday, June 27, there will be two special screenings of a new documentary at The Lido Theatre.Produced by Heidi McKillop, ‘A Stranded Nation’ is a documentary that addresses the key issues around Canadian oil and gas development and explores the interconnections between oil and gas and everyday life.The documentary features interviews with prominent industry leaders and supporters of the Canadian Natural Resource sector.- Advertisement -McKillop says the goal of the documentary is for people across Canada, particularly young people, to be better informed about oil and gas.She also says Alberta’s concerns should be heard and that the country needs to work together.“Our overall message is that Canada is not an environmental laggard, it’s not dirty oil, that Alberta’s concerns should be heard and that we need to start working together cross-provincially.”Advertisementlast_img read more