Mayor Jay Gillian: Updated Capital Plan and New Budget on the Way

first_imgMayor Jay GillianThe following is Ocean City Mayor Jay Gillian’s weekly update to citizens posted on Wednesday, Dec. 31.Dear Friends,I would like to wish each of you and your family a happy and healthy New Year and a prosperous 2015.I am excited to begin 2015 and look forward to a continued positive working relationship with City Council.  In the first two months of the New Year, the Administration will be presenting an updated capital plan to City Council and introducing a budget.  These are important documents to guide our City forward and continue the safe, clean, family friendly services our residents, guests and businesses have come to expect and enjoy.I would like to thank the City’s Board and Commission volunteers whose terms ended in 2014. City Council and I are grateful for their service and dedication, and we acknowledge that our City is improved because of their commitment.Michele and I would like to extend best wishes to all of you for a happy 2015!Warm regards,Jay A. GillianMayorlast_img read more

Press release: CMA clears Co-op / Nisa merger

first_img Millions of people throughout the UK shop at convenience stores and supermarkets, and it is vital that they continue to have enough choice to get the best value for them. After careful consideration, we’ve found that there is sufficient competition in both the wholesale and retail sectors to ensure that shoppers are not worse off. The merger will therefore not be referred for an in-depth investigation.Information relating to this investigation can be found on the case page. After closely examining all the evidence, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has found that the proposed merger does not give rise to competition concerns.The Co-operative Group Ltd (Co-op), as a groceries retailer, and Nisa Retail Ltd (Nisa), as a groceries wholesaler, do not compete head-to-head. However, since Nisa supplies over 4,000 groceries stores, the CMA has carefully considered the potential impact of the merger on competition between shops.During the course of its ‘Phase 1’ investigation, the CMA took into account that Nisa-supplied stores would still be free to set their own prices and decide which products to stock after the merger, and so the merged company would not be able to directly determine how they compete.It also examined whether the merged company could raise prices or reduce service quality for retail or wholesale customers. It found that existing retail and wholesale competition made this unlikely.This is because there are enough local alternatives to both Co-op and Nisa-supplied stores to ensure that people could still shop around to get the best value for them.Furthermore, Nisa-supplied stores are able to choose between several different wholesalers and would be able to switch supplier if prices were to increase or the quality of service go down as a result of the merger with Co-op.This all means that the merged company would be unlikely to be able to raise prices or offer a worse service to either stores or to shoppers.Sheldon Mills, Senior Director of Mergers at the CMA, said:last_img read more

Students prepare for the MCAT

first_imgNotre Dame pre-med students face a notoriously difficult schedule with academic and extracurricular activities, a stressful balancing act which reaches new heights when it comes time to take the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT).  Junior biology and theology major Antoinette Pusateri said she will be one of the pre-med students taking the test this upcoming Saturday. Although she has faced a busy schedule because of the additional task of studying for the MCAT this semester, Pusateri said there are some positive results stemming from the experience of studying for the MCAT. “If anything, what I would take away from the whole pre-med, studying-for-the-MCAT experience would be the art of prioritizing, of time management,” Pusateri said. “It’s definitely been a learning curve, but that’s kind of the college experience for everybody.” Pusateri said she set up a study schedule specifically for the MCAT, and made sure she stuck to it. “I really started hardcore studying after finals fall semester and then really every day since then, with a few days off,” Pusateri said. “[I’ve been studying] at least a couple hours a day,” Pusateri said.  Despite stress associated with studying for the MCAT, Pusateri said she feels prepared for the exam on Saturday.  “First and foremost, I don’t think anywhere else prepares us better than Notre Dame,” Pusateri said. “I went through the notecards and notes that our professor had us make for organic chemistry and basically, out of all the cards and notes I had, I only needed a fourth of that for studying.” Junior biology and peace studies major Gwyneth Sullivan is electing to take the MCAT in late May, outside of the confines of the semester, but within the upcoming admissions cycle. Though her test date is further away, she said she still has tried to continue her preparation, which started is January. “Ideally, I’m doing two hours of study a night, but realistically if I have a huge exam, like my physics test this week, I’ll push it off a little bit” Sullivan said. “It’s a lot of time management.” A prominent factor in her decision to take the MCAT in May rather than this Saturday is the annual benefit her family hosts in Chicago in remembrance of her brother, Declan Sullivan, she said. “The benefit is actually this weekend so there’s no way I could have physically taken the MCAT,” Sullivan said. “Especially in the last three weeks, I’ve been doing so much logistical work for it that it’s been hard to study.” Other pre-med students have decided to forego sitting the MCAT during the school year in favor of taking it during the summer. Chantal Berry, a junior anthropology and preprofessional major, is one student who chose this less traditional path, instead opting to take the MCAT in August. “What I found with my friends that were either taking the MCAT this weekend or in May was that it’s been a very stressful semester,” Berry said. “I didn’t really want to have that stress, I wanted to get the most out of my college experience in terms of the academics and I wanted the sole focus to be the academics.” Taking the test later means Berry will not receive her scores in time for the upcoming admissions cycle, but she said she already decided on taking a gap year after finishing her studies at Notre Dame. “I think the decision to take a gap year was partially the MCAT reason but also just because I wanted that time off before once again getting right back into academics and medical school,” Berry said. Contact Henry Gens at [email protected]last_img read more