Injury concerns on the fore as selectors leave out Kedar Jhadav

first_imgAdvertisementThe Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) on Thursday announced the 15-member squad for the remaining three one day internationals (ODIs) against the Windies. While pacers Jasprit Bumrah and Bhuvneshwar returned to the ODI setup, Mohammed Shami was dropped from the team. Middle-order batsman Kedar Jadhav, who recently played Deodhar Trophy for India A was also left out of the 15-man squad.Kedar Jadhav celebrating a wicket.Startled by his omission, the 33-year-old said, “I need to see why they didn’t pick me. I have cleared all tests and that’s why I played the match today. I am match fit. Unless you clear all tests you, shouldn’t be picked for and matches and since I was fit the selectors asked me to play the Deodhar game. If I am not in the Indian team, I’ll focus on playing Ranji Trophy.”Kedar Jadhav after the squad announcement said that there was no communication over his exclusion from the Indian team management. “I did not know this,” said Jadhav when asked if there was any communication over his selection for the remaining three games against the Windies.Jadhav was asked to join the India ‘A’ team. Perhaps the selectors wanted an assessment of his fitness before they could ultimately draft him into the squad for the fourth ODI against the Windies. “We don’t want to rush him. He has been breaking down whenever he has made a comeback. We wanted to give him enough game time to test his body. We hoped that he would be playing the Deodhar final but unfortunately his team lost.” Prasad told in an interview.“He will come back to the team. There is no doubt about his ability. You can’t hide things. I expect the same honesty from their side,” Prasad added.After a tied encounter in Vizag, India and West Indies face off for the third ODI against West Indies on October 27 in Pune.Advertisementlast_img read more

Tsitsipas to US Open Umpire in Tirade: ‘You’re All Weirdos!’ (Videos)

first_imgNEW YORK — Stefanos Tsitsipas accused a U.S. Open chair umpire of having a bias against him during a tirade in which he told the official, “You’re all weirdos!”Tsitsipas told Damien Dumusois that the cause of his bias was “because you’re French probably and you’re all weirdos!”The argument came midway through the fourth set of Tsitsipas’ 6-4, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 7-5 loss to Andrey Rublev on Tuesday, a day when he and fellow young star Dominic Thiem both lost in the first round for the second straight major tournament.Tsitsipas, the No. 8 seed from Greece, appeared to be battling cramps and was slow to return to the court after losing his serve.Dumusois told Tsitsipas it was time to play, but Tsitsipas was still reaching into his bag for a new headband and screamed at Dumusois that he still needed time to change. Dumusois responded that Tsitsipas would be penalized.“I don’t care,” Tsitsipas replied. “Do whatever you want, because you’re the worst.”“I don’t know what you have against me,” Tsitsipas continued. “Because you’re French probably and you’re all weirdos! You’re all weirdos!””You have something against me. You’re French, probably. … You’re all weirdos.” Things didn’t go to plan for No. 8 seed Stefanos Tsitsipas in the first round of the #USOpenMORE: https://t.co/QQHPExZwHz pic.twitter.com/4VzjFEJkz0— ESPN Australia & NZ (@ESPNAusNZ) August 27, 2019Dumusois is indeed French.Tsitsipas had been angry that Dumusois believed he was getting coaching during the match from his father, Apostolos, which is not allowed.“The chair umpire was very incorrect in what he was telling me during the match,” Tsitsipas said afterward. “I don’t know what this chair umpire has in specific against my team, but he’s been complaining and telling me that my team talks all of the time when I’m out on the court playing. He’s very — I don’t know. I believe he’s not right, because I never hear anything of what my team says from the outside.”Tsitsipas added that he thought tennis needed more umpires who are fair to all players.“I feel like some of them have preferences when they are on the court,” he said.Tsitsipas opened his Grand Slam season by beating Roger Federer en route to the Australian Open semifinals. He fell at Wimbledon to Thomas Fabbiano, who then sent Thiem to another quick exit by beating the No. 4 seed 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2 on a day when four top-10 seeds in the bottom half of the bracket were upset.The two-time French Open runner-up said he was battling an illness leading into the tournament and said he was exhausted after two sets.“I’m far away from 100%,” Thiem said. “Like this, it’s very tough to win.”Tsitsipas was clear that his problems stemmed from the influence of Dumusois.“Well, it’s not very pleasant when you have the umpire give you warnings and time violations and coaching violations during a match,” Tsitsipas said. “It can affect your thinking. It can affect your decision-making.”By BRIAN MAHONEY AP Sports WriterTweetPinShare77 Shareslast_img read more

New TrudeauTrump opioid plan helps rebuild frayed relations from trade talks

first_imgOTTAWA — The ranking U.S. diplomat on drug enforcement policy is to visit Ottawa in July to kick-start a fresh round of co-operation between the two countries on tackling the opioid crisis.That includes a renewed focus on stemming the flow of fentanyl into the two countries from China, The Canadian Press has learned.The visit of Kirsten Madison, the State Department’s assistant secretary for international narcotics and law enforcement affairs, would be the first tangible step forward in the new joint Canada-U.S. effort that hatched out of the June 20 White House meeting between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President Donald Trump.Stamping out opioid overdose deaths, especially in the Rust Belt states such as Ohio and Pennsylvania, has been a declared priority for Trump, whose path to victory in 2016 depended on voters in those states.Trudeau announced the new initiative after his meeting with Trump, saying the two countries will work together and in multilateral organizations to find solutions to the crisis while deepening law-enforcement co-operation to combat trafficking.A senior government official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the high-level initiative, said Madison’s July visit will start the discussion by reviewing existing co-operation and mapping out new strategies.Only a small amount of illegal opioids enter the U.S .from Canada, which the U.S. readily acknowledges. The biggest source of the deadly drug for both countries is mail and courier packages from China, said the official.Jim Carroll, the director of White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, has also expressed interest in coming to Ottawa to discuss opioids, said the official.The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa said it wasn’t announcing any upcoming meetings between Canada and the U.S. but that the two countries are working closely to combat the opioid crisis and the emerging global synthetic-drugs crisis.A leading health expert questions whether all of the sudden flurry of cross-border meetings will actually lead to any concrete reduction of fatal overdoses in either country.Donald MacPherson, the director of the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, said the focus on law enforcement — particularly intercepting mail from China — ignores the need for better medical intervention such as “substitution treatment.”Some medical journals suggest using methadone as a substitute to wean addicts off fentanyl.MacPherson is also skeptical that either country can do anything to stem the flow of fentanyl from China.“Fentanyl is a drug-smuggler’s dream. It’s so powerful. It comes in very small packages. It’s very easy to move across borders. It’s hard to detect. It’s changed the nature of the illegal drug market, and possibly forever.”Ben Rowswell, the president of the Canadian International Council, says the initiative has a greater symbolic importance because it is part of the upward arc in bilateral relations from the last year’s bottoming-out after the G7 summit in Quebec, when Trump insulted Trudeau on Twitter.“I take it as a sign that the relationship is operating as it should now, after a year or two of not,” said Rowswell, a retired diplomat who last served as the Canadian ambassador to Venezuela.“It seems we’re taking advantage of this new opening from the United States to normalize the relationship.”Tackling the crisis is clearly a passion of Trump’s. That was on full display during a June 12 White House cabinet briefing that was televised on the U.S. non-profit C-Span broadcaster.Carroll, the U.S. drug-policy chief, told Trump China is starting to take its fentanyl outflow seriously, and that he’s planning to visit the People’s Republic in the summer to follow-up.“Absolutely, they’re now at the table,” Carroll told the president. “They want to talk to us. They’re engaged.”Admiral Brett Giroir, assistant secretary for health at the U.S. Department of Health, brought Trump more good news: new data from the Centers for Disease Control that showed overdose deaths falling for the sixth consecutive month versus the same months the previous year.That included drops of 4.8 per cent in New Hampshire, 8.1 per cent in Florida, 10.3 per cent in West Virginia, 18.2 per cent in Iowa, 18.5 per cent in Pennsylvania, and 23.3 per cent in Ohio.Dan Ujczo, a cross-border expert with the Ohio law firm Dickinson Wright, said his state has been devastated by the opioid crisis, particularly in rural and industrial areas that are seen as “Trump country.”As a result,  if Canada and the U.S. find common cause on tackling the crisis it will build a “reservoir of goodwill between the two countries and leaders,” said Ujczo, a trade specialist who paid close attention to the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement that spawned the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA.“If all politics is local, all trade is personal. Collaboration on issues that are devastating communities in Canada and the U.S. show that we are in this together,” said Ujczo.“While I do not believe that this type of collaboration will move the needle on USMCA, it builds that goodwill for other issues such as (customs) preclearance, migration issues, and serves as a preventative measure from any future tweetstorm.”Mike Blanchfield, The Canadian Presslast_img read more