Pochettino expects his side to beat PSV

first_imgTottenham have had a very slow start to the season in the Champions League as they were beaten away from home by Inter and at home by Barcelona – now, they have to win over PSV to remain in the fight for the knockout stage places.The former Southampton coach spoke about his expectations ahead of the important game as he said, according to 101 Great Goals: “If we are not capable of winning this type of game we cannot win the title.“We need more. I think we are so competitive over the last four-and-a-half-years, but to win a title is the last step, to push the team and the club.”Victor Wanyama, Tottenham Hotspur, Premier LeaguePochettino admits Wanyama remains in his Spurs plans Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Kenyan international, Victor Wanyama, was the protagonist of a summer transfer saga, but in the end, he is set to stay at Tottenham Hotspur.“I think it’s so important the Champions League game against Eindhoven if we want to be alive in the competition. It’s a must-win game.”“Four-and-a-half-years ago when they offered me the Tottenham job the idea was to build a team for the Champions League in the moment we arrive in the new stadium.”“This is our third Champions League in a row, one at White Hart Lane, three times at Wembley. We are ahead of the project. We are miles ahead.”last_img read more

Delhiites time to dig in

first_imgDelhi is one city where you will find cuisines of different regions and even countries. Whether you want French, Thai, Italian, Nepalese or Bihari, Bengali, Marathi, Goan — you can totally satisfy the foodie in you in this city. But while global is good, the Capital also scores high when it comes to its own cuisine. And now, you can sample all of Delhi’s delicacies at the Delhi Tourism organised Delhi Ke Pakwan festiva. The festival brings together the culinary delights from the various lanes of Old Delhi and  other parts of the city as well. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Glorifying the past, and keeping with the present, the food of Delhi is as diverse as the people it consists of. The amalgamation of different recipes from different cultures produced the dishes which are unique and deliciously different. The festival has a collection ranging from Mughlai foods comprising Nihari, kababs, Ulte tawa ki roti, chicken dishes and biryanis. You can also dig into street food like pav bhaaji, pani puri and chaats. Or sample desserts like Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflixgulab jamun, moong and gajar ka halwa and kulfis and of course the very Indian refreshner- Banarasi meetha paan. Young and old alike flocked to these stalls and enjoyed the food with obvious relish.The first day also saw a cultural programme consisting of Rajasthan folk dance and songs. Jazzing up the decor are decorated rickshaws and autos for click-happy visitors, a Banyan wishing tree, a handicraft exhibition. A dhaba-like setting with cots scattered around adds a nostalgic touch. There are vendors from Purani Dilli who have set up stalls, the famous chicken dishes from Chandni Chowk are also on sale. The sheer number of visitors who turned up for the opening day of the festival clearly proves that no matter how many Western and modern food outlets have opened in the city, the Capital’s very own cuisine will always remain a hot favourite. Go check it out.last_img read more

Striking a spiritual chord

first_imgAfter three days of devotional music and expressions of selfless bhakti, curtains came down at the Bhakti Sangeet Festival, with Kabir bhajans and other strains of spiritual music echoing through the air.Kabir Café, a music band that draws inspiration from a deep understanding of Saint Kabir’s beautiful verses, performed on the last day, with its ‘Kabir bhajans’ vowing one and all. Others who performed on the last day were Arshad Ali Khan who sang Krishna bhakti poetry, Sumitra Guha whose performance was dedicated to Ram Bhakti, and Master Saleem who rendered the mellifluous Punjabi Sufiana Kalaam. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Delhi’s much-loved annual Bhakti Sangeet festival was presented by Sahitya Kala Parishad and Department of Art, Culture & Languages, Govt of Delhi. This year it had nine individual and group performances of Bhakti and Sufiana renditions over three days at Nehru Park, Chanakyapuri.No matter what language we speak or which culture we adhere to, there are certain elements of human consciousness that transcend all tangible differences. Devotion to the Ultimate Being is one of those universal sentiments that find expressions in multiple forms. Be it in the form of bhajans or qawwalis or Gospel music, devotional music is one form of expression that does not fail to strike the chords of believers. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixOver three days popular singers such as Anup Jalota and Shubha Mudgal performed different devotional strains of music.“Every individual soul finds its own way to connect with the eternal reality. Some perceive the Creator as a formless transcendent reality; others conceptualise Him in a human form. In different cultures and languages, people develop and nurture their own devotional traditions. Each region borrows from the saints that roamed in their lands. Music is a form that resonates with people across the world by aligning the mystic frequencies of a mind to verbal expression of love,” says Shubha Mudgal. From devotional traditions of South India to Meera bhajans, to ‘Nirgun’ bhakti and kalams of Bulleshah, the three-day festival showcased the variety of devotional music of India.Other singers who performed at the festival were Meeta Pandit who introduced the Delhi audience to the beautiful devotional traditions of South India; Iqbal Ahmad Khan who sang Meera bhajans; the adorable Nooran sisters who rendered the kalams of Bulleshah, and Dhruv Sangari who also performed Sufiana kalams. The annual Bhakti Sangeet Festival serves the purpose of unifying and bringing together the multiple traditions of Indian devotional music at one stage.last_img read more