Adjustment dials must be disabled, sealed on Crane ignition boxes in 2017

first_imgVINTON, Iowa – IMCA will require four ignition boxes available from Crane Ignition to have adjustment dials disabled and permanently sealed when used in sanctioned Modified, Late Model or Stock Car competition in 2017.Those ignition boxes are:Crane HI-6RC ignition part number 6000-6700;Crane HI-6N Oval track ignition part number 6000-6410 (Weatherpak Plug);Crane HI-6N Oval track ignition, part number 6000-6412 (Deutsch Plug);and Crane HI-6RN oval track ignition, part number 6000-6750 (Digital).“These ignition boxes all have adjustable RPM limits and, as a result, an issue that allows them to operate at a different RPM limit than what the box is physically set with the adjustment dials,” explained Dave Brenn, IMCA’s executive director of competition. “For 2017, these existing Crane ignition boxes will still be allowed but must have the adjustment dials disabled and permanently sealed, effectively making the box operate as a preset RPM limited box.”“After choosing the desired RPM limit, the box must have a cover plate permanently sealed with an epoxy-type adhesive over the dials,” he continued. “Silicone or other non-permanent adhesives will not be allowed.  Failure to seal these ignition boxes will result in an immediate disqualification when used in any IMCA event.”On Dec 31, 2017, all four products will be removed from IMCA’s approved ignition list.last_img read more

Clarke calls for Baggies graft

first_img West Brom’s next two matches are against Cardiff and at home to Hull and Clarke has told his players they need to roll up their sleeves in order to get their season back on track. “There is no other way,” he said. “It’s been a difficult week for us. Three defeats in a week is sore, it’s painful, it’s hard to take but next week we have to go to Cardiff, we have to be resilient and we have to start getting points on the board. “There is no easy solution. “This was two teams who had not been getting the best results recently, feeling each other out. From nowhere they got that first goal, it gave them something to hang on to and set us back a bit.” That first Norwich goal came courtesy of a superb finish from Gary Hooper, who raced away from Diego Lugano – the Uruguayan defender’s hesitant performance will surely have caught England manager Roy Hodgson’s eye – onto a Leroy Fer pass to smash an unstoppable drive beyond Boaz Myhill. It was the former Celtic striker’s third Premier League goal, and his fifth in total, and manager Chris Hughton believes the 25-year-old is starting to find his best form after an injury-hit start to life at Carrow Road. “He is now physically fit,” he said. “As a striker, to get injured one week before the start of the season when you have just arrived makes it very difficult. But Gary is one who if we provide him with chances will score goals. “His CV shows he is someone who is a very good finisher but of course you have to have opportunities so we have to give him a service that will allow him to do that.” A clean sheet was also more than welcome for the Canaries, who shipped five goals to a Luis Suarez-inspired Liverpool in midweek, and were handed a seven-goal drubbing by Manchester City at the start of November. Hughton hopes his side can now find some consistency at the back. He said: “It’s a balancing act, we have brought in a few new players. During our best period last season we had a very consistent back four and midfield four. “But we found it tough from Christmas onwards. It’s something we have to work on but there is a balance between being a good team defensively and having what it takes to win games.” The Baggies’ 2-0 home defeat to Norwich was their third in succession after previous losses to Newcastle and Manchester City, although Albion had more than enough chances to take at least a point against the Canaries. It also extended a longer sequence of just one win from their last nine Premier League games and leaves them only two points above the relegation zone. Steve Clarke has told his West Brom side there will be no substitute for hard work as they look to turn around a “painful” run of results. Press Associationlast_img read more

Snack Media boosts global audience with GIVEMESPORT acquisition

first_img Bragg’s sports media subsidiary GMS gets NJ affiliate approval January 9, 2020 SBC’s On The Ball – Going Dutch October 12, 2018 Related Articles Share StumbleUpon Share Snack Media drives digital growth with Wisden partnership July 9, 2020 Submit Snack Media has strengthened its offering to advertisers, rights holders and independent media owners after acquiring GIVEMESPORT.The combined business will have an audience of over 210 million unique users across all platforms, and will offer coverage from football, Formula 1, tennis, golf, combat sports and esports.Niall Coen, CEO of Snack Media, commented: “We are delighted to have acquired GIVEMESPORT and are tremendously excited by the opportunity it presents. Not only the size and quality of the audience we now have but also the strength of expertise of the GIVEMESPORT team.“When we started Snack Media 13 years ago, we wanted to become the best new media sports business in the UK and since then we have grown organically. Our guiding values, sound strategy, great people and long-lasting relationships with our publishing partners have stood the test of time. Enabling us to grow even through these uncertain times.“We are extremely confident about the positive benefits that this acquisition can bring to new clients and the stakeholders in the Snack Media group. It marks a new and exciting phase for the business.”He added: “The acquisition adds tremendous value to our proposition for both Advertisers, Sponsors, Rights Holders and Publishers. Snack Media is now one of the largest sports media platforms in the UK. The aim is to become one of the largest sports publishers in the world.”last_img read more

Emmanuel Adebayor signs short-term deal with Crystal Palace

first_imgCrystal Palace completed the signing of former Tottenham striker Emmanuel Adebayor on Tuesday.Adebayor was a free agent after leaving Tottenham in September. He visited Palace’s training ground for talks on Tuesday before finalising a short-term deal until the end of the season.The deal includes an option for a longer extension should he impress at Selhurst Park, sources say, and Adebayor has accepted the offer despite initially wanting a long-term contract.The striker’s future has been the subject of speculation for some time with a number of clubs credited with an interest in his services.Palace boss Alan Pardew revealed earlier this month that he was considering a move for Adebayor to help solve his side’s goal scoring problems.The Adebayor deal also signals the end of Palace’s reported interest in signing Chelsea striker Loic Remy on loan, with sources saying Newcastle have made a loan enquiry for the Frenchman. –Follow Joy Sports on Twitter: @JoyFMSports. Our hashtag is #JoySportslast_img read more

Tommy John, Jamie Moyer weigh in: Can anyone play a quarter century in MLB?

first_img How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Considering advancements in medicine, coaching techniques, and the emergence of biomechanical data, this seems counterintuitive. Yet the reason behind the vanishing over-40 pitcher is no secret. By emphasizing velocity, baseball’s prevailing game theory has turned pitching from a series of distance races into a series of sprints. The well-paced marathoner – the master of the complete game – has become less valuable than ever.John knows this. He doesn’t like it.Pitchers, he said, “can try to go on and pitch longer, or pitch the way the general managers and the techies want them to pitch – the Yalies, the Harvard guys and all that.”“The owner of the team looks at the bottom line: did we make money this year? You go from there,” John continued. “I’m a bottom-line pitching guy. I want to see wins. I don’t watch baseball anymore. It’s not the same game I played. The game’s changed. The players in it have changed. … I don’t think they appreciate the game and respect the game for what they’ve got. They’ve got a rare talent. They don’t respect it. I don’t like to see it.”Moyer, who retired midway through the 2012 season, holds a more agnostic view.“The sabermetrics have changed the game,” he said. “I’m not affiliated with an organization and I don’t know a lot about it. I’m not here to condone it, but it’s different. There’s a way for all of it to work together.”Unlike John, Moyer said he gladly watches baseball at home.“What the Milwaukee Brewers did last season was fantastic,” he said. “The starting rotation was probably their weakest link. The bullpen was one of their stronger links. I thought (Manager) Craig Counsell did a fabulous job with what he had. When you get into the playoffs, you don’t need five starters; you only need three or possibly a fourth. Their bullpen was so strong, so dominant, and it got them almost to the World Series. They did it a lot differently than how we’re used to seeing baseball being played.”By 2018 standards, John and Moyer were extreme finesse pitchers. They concede their careers are products of a bygone era, the relics of a dying trend. While it’s accurate to ascribe their longevity to when and how they pitched, it’s unfair to their perseverance.John wasn’t ready to retire in May 1989. After he was released by the Yankees, John said he tried hooking on with a handful of teams to no avail. Not once, he said, did he look around and wonder what he was doing on the same field as men half his age.“I loved playing baseball. That’s why I kept playing it as long as I did,” John said. “I loved competing. I loved it. That’s why I had Tommy John surgery. I asked Dr. Jobe if I needed it. He said, ‘no you don’t need it, but if you don’t have it you’ll never pitch again.’ It wasn’t that I was making $15 million. I wanted to pitch.”Once, midway through a disappointing 2006 season, Moyer said he resolved to retire at year’s end. That changed when he was traded by the Seattle Mariners to the Philadelphia Phillies in August. He gladly waived his 10-and-5 rights to accommodate the trade to a contending team.Four years later, weeks away from his 48th birthday, Moyer faced another dilemma. He was attempting to rehab his ailing elbow with the Leones del Escogido of the Dominican Winter League. In his third appearance, Moyer said he completely tore the ulnar collateral ligament and flexor pronator tendon in his left elbow.When the Phillies’ team physician offered a recommendation of surgery, Moyer said he went to the late Dr. Lewis Yocum for a second opinion.Related Articles Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error “(Yocum) said, ‘look, you tore this thing pretty good’,” Moyer recalled. “‘I can fix it just so you can do some simple things for the rest of your life – golf, play catch – or I can fix it like I would if you’re 25, 30 years old. You’re probably not going to pitch again.’ I said, really? I took that as a challenge.“For me, it was the challenge of getting through the surgery. I only wanted to play if I felt like I could contribute.”Moyer did contribute again, finishing his major league career with the Colorado Rockies at age 49. In his third-to-last start, Moyer tapped a weak grounder between the mound and first base, and eluded the tag of Arizona Diamondbacks first baseman Paul Goldschmidt for a single. Two runs scored on the play, making Moyer the oldest player ever with an RBI.It’s a record he might never concede.“If you look at pitching these days, everything is max effort,” he said. “Look at the younger generations – high school, college, minor leagues, everybody’s trying to light up a radar gun, throw 100 mph. Our bodies aren’t made to perform in this game as a pitcher at max effort.”Not a 49-year-old’s body. Major League Baseball is no country for middle-aged men.center_img Angels fail to take series in Oakland, lose in 10 innings “You see ’em all the time,” John said, pausing for effect. “They’re coaches and managers.”Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.“On the field? No,” he continued. “The guys who run the game now are more into the metrics, the spin on your fastball and curveball, the velocity, and as you get older it’s a fact: you start losing speed on your fastball. You just can’t do it. Jamie Moyer, he and I pitched the same way. (Tom) Glavine, (Greg) Maddux, we pitched the same way. You can’t compete at 46 throwing 100-mph fastballs. I could’ve if they let me use steroids.”Major league players lost their hall pass to the PED aisle in increments over a decade. Pitchers now strategically exchange the complete game for shorter starts featuring faster fastballs – a pitch that averaged 92.8 mph last season. Free agents are aging out of the market ever earlier. Add it up, and it’s easy to understand why the average MLB player age is trending younger.The irony of all this isn’t lost on John. He is less famous for his 26 seasons and 288 wins than a landmark medical procedure. If Dr. Frank Jobe had not replaced the ulnar collateral ligament in John’s left elbow in September 1974, he might have been forced to retire at age 32. Tommy John surgery carried the promise of extending pitchers’ careers – it has – but what John and Moyer accomplished looks less and less likely by the day.Hope for another 26-year career dies in the numbers. Toss out the period in which baseball treated standard drug tests as optional, and the distribution of seasons featuring pitchers over age 40 looks almost random. MLB’s kindest year to over-40 pitchers was 2007. That year, 18 men pitched past their 40th birthday. Next on the list is 2006, with 15. The 1945 season, a year when World War II forced younger men into military service, featured 14 over-40 pitchers. Next is 2008. In fact, of the top 30 seasons on this list, only one (2017) took place after regular-season HGH blood tests were introduced in 2013. Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Tommy John is driving south on Interstate 5, somewhere between Bakersfield and the Bay Area, when his cell phone reception cuts out. Our call drops a moment later. I call him back. “This is Gavin Newsom,” says the voice on the other end. I have reached Tommy John’s sense of humor.As a rookie with the 1963 Cleveland Indians, John was teammates with World War II veteran Early Wynn. When John was released by the New York Yankees on May 30, 1989, the Yankees purchased Deion Sanders’ contract from Triple-A the next day. One might say his 26-year career started early and ended in prime time. In so doing, John persevered longer than all but two major league players: Nolan Ryan and 19th-century pioneer Cap Anson. That excludes the 1975 season John missed while recovering from a surgery that now bears his name.I called John because, maybe it’s just me, but it seems his longevity might never be surpassed. The math doesn’t look good. Bartolo Colon, 45, would need to pitch in each of the next five seasons to get to 26. Outfielder Ichiro Suzuki counted off his 27th season of professional baseball last year in Seattle, but only if you include his first nine seasons in Japan.I caught John lamenting the limits of GSM cells while tumbling down the Interstate en route to humble acclaim. The Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation will honor John and 25-year veteran Jamie Moyer with Iron Man awards Saturday at its annual “In The Spirit Of The Game” dinner in Beverly Hills. This token of recognition might too be meager. We might not see another 46-year-old in MLB.last_img read more